Games

Eddie Verrett: Becoming a Hero

Out of college, Eddie Verrett thought he would go right into the NFL, and his future would be assured. Like the overwhelming vast majority of college players, it didn’t work out that way. He got looked at by a couple of teams and was a member of the Dallas Cowboys practice squad for a while, but the 6’3” 250 pound DE was eventually cut.  He moved to Louisiana to stay with his mom and found work, but never really felt comfortable with his situation.  Eddie decided he wanted to return to Virginia where he had attended high school. He had a girlfriend there, and they had a baby together so he decided that being in his daughters’ life was the best thing he could do for everyone including himself. After the move, he began working out to try to get another chance at the NFL which is when he got a call from the Atlanta Vultures. He’d never played arena ball before, but he knew what it was and decided to give it a shot, but once again, things didn’t go as planned.

AF Insider: Hi Eddie, thanks for speaking with me. If you don’t mind, I’d like to speak with you about your experience in arena football. I know it hasn’t always been good and I think your fans will be interested in your story.

EV: Yeah, no problem man, and thanks. I was in Norfolk working out, and I got a phone call from an AIF arena team called the Atlanta Vultures. I knew about arena football but had never played. I’m from Louisiana, so I knew about the Voodoo and the AFL. My first year in arena ball was with Atlanta, but it wasn’t a good operation. I didn’t get paid; we had no gym, no proper nourishment and on the first day of practice, we ran so much that I became shaky. We ran and ran for like three hours, just running, and I became dehydrated. We had no water, no trainers, no physicals, and they just ran us. It was crazy. We did it again on the second day, not quite as much, but we just ran and ran. On the third day, I got to the parking lot and began feeling like I was catching the flu or something. I was sitting in my car, and I wrapped myself up because I was feeling cold, but it was super-hot outside. I was dehydrated  

It may seem counterintuitive, but dehydration can bring on chills. “This occurs because your body starts to limit blood flow to the skin. In addition, water holds heat, so if you become dehydrated it can be more difficult to regulate your body temperature, which can make you become chilled faster, even when you’re not in a cold environment.” Dr. Podesta, Health.com

AF Insider: Dehydration can be very dangerous. Korey Stringer, a player for the Vikings, died from extreme dehydration. What did you do?
EV: I called my agent, and he set up an appointment for me at Emory Hospital. I was diagnosed with dehydration and muscle exhaustion. Over those two days, I went from 250 down to 240. I was lucky I had family in the area to help me through that. When I returned to camp, the owner/player was an offensive lineman, and we were doing one on ones, not outside moves, just head to head and I kept pushing him back. I’d lost a lot of weight and strength, but I kept pushing him back. He was 300 lbs and I was down to 240 and that was embarrassing for him. A couple of days later, I got a call from the coach who said he loved me, but the owner didn’t really care for me. Unfortunately, a lot of things went under the table. They owed me money for the hospital bills, and I never saw a cent of it.  
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UNDRA HENDRIX EXPLAINS SLIDE PROTECTION

03/28/2018

NAL ALL-STAR AND LEHIGH VALLEY STEELHAWK, UNDRA HENDRIX

Interviewing players and coaches creates an interesting dilemma for me as a journalist. I know a lot about football, but clearly not everything. Every now and then, someone will use a term, I either don’t know, or I do know, but not necessarily enough to write about. After all, if I don’t understand a subject how can I write about it in a clear and concise way the readers will understand. When I run into this situation, I stop the interview and have my subject explain the term to me. I see it as a learning opportunity and I’ve benefited from speaking with some of the smartest people in the sport. Not long ago I was messaging with my friend, Lehigh Valley Full Back, NAL All-Star, Undra Hendrix, and picking his brain about some bit of terminology or another when we realized we had an opportunity to help fans to understand arena football a little bit better.

A coach of a team who’d just watched his QB get knocked around for 60 minutes told me the offensive line wasn’t communicating with each other very well. I pressed him for an explanation, and he said they weren’t always sliding the same way, and it was creating rushing lanes and ruining their passing game. Anyone at the game could easily see the huge holes in the O-line, and I already knew the term Slide Protection, but I only had a general understanding of what it meant. It’s pretty obvious that everyone on the O-line needs to know who they’re going to block on every play but how is that determined? Confusion on even one play could be the difference between winning and losing. I haven’t played football since I was a little kid, and I immediately realized I didn’t know enough about the term to write about it in a way my readers deserve; enter Undra. I asked him to explain the term, and this is our conversation.

AF Insider: Hi Undra, as a fullback I know you’re an integral part of the blocking scheme, and I was wondering if you could explain to me what “Slide Protection” is? Continue reading

APF Championship Game

by Jay Luster

Wearing a Gatorade soaked Roughriders shirt; owner Gregg Fornario accepted the APF Championship trophy then shouted to the fans crowding the end zone, “We did it Richmond. We did it!”  

Playing before the biggest crowd of the season, the Richmond Roughriders hosted the Florida Tarpons at the Richmond Coliseum for the first Arena Pro Football Championship game. The Riders won the right to host the game by beating Florida on May 6th in Richmond. That game featured 17 year indoor football veteran QB Chris Wallace’s Tarpon’s debut. While not a running threat, Wallace is an accurate passer and a stout presence in the pocket. That night, the Richmond squad proved to be too much for Florida beating them handily 55-34. While the Riders dominated the game overall, the Tarpons defensive line shortened QB Jimmy Laughrea’s night by putting him out of the game with a knee injury. Laughrea wouldn’t play again until the June 10th rematch for the championship. Continue reading